Andrea Buccarella, clavicembalo

Monte Compatri (RM), Italia

Palazzo Annibaldeschi

6:30 PM

18.30 - Andrea Buccarella, clavicembalo

GAETANO GRECO e i suoi contemporanei

Gaetano Greco (ca. 1657 – 1728)
Ballo di Mantua
Intavolatura per Cembalo

Francesco Durante (1684 – 1755)
Sonata Quinta – I. Studio (Fuga), II. Divertimento (Allegro)
(from “6 Sonate per Cembalo divisi in studii e divertimenti”, Napoli 1747)

Gaetano Greco
Intavolatura per Cembalo

Francesco Nicola Fago (1677 – 1745)
Toccata per Cembalo (Largo – [Allegro] – Largo – Allegro)

Gaetano Greco
Intavolatura per Cembalo

Francesco Durante
Sonata per Cembalo “Le quattro stagioni dell’anno” (1747)
I. Primavera, II. Estate (Andante, Cresce il caldo, Presto), III. Autunno (Amabile), IV. Inverno (Tuoni, Lampi, Saette)

Gaetano Greco
Toccata per Cembalo (Toccata, Fuga e Corrente)

Andrea Buccarella
clavicembalo

Biglietto 10€

Short description
Gaetano Greco (ca. 1657 – 1728) was one of the most influential musicians and teachers of his generation. He was trained at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo, where he studied with Giovanni Salvatore, Gennaro Ursino and possibly Francesco Provenzale, and in 1696 he became Primo Maestro at the same institution. Francesco Durante, Leonardo Vinci, Nicola Porpora and Domenico Scarlatti were among his pupils (perhaps also Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, who was a pupil at the conservatory from 1726). Greco’s keyboard works are collected in several manuscripts entitled Intavolature per cembalo, amongst which his Ballo di Mantua and his Toccata XII are definitely his best and more well-known pieces. Francesco Nicola Fago (1677 – 1745) and Francesco Durante (1684 – 1755) were both considered two of the best teachers and church composers of their period. Fago’s Toccata per cembalo is the only one of his keyboard works that has survived. It was probably written in the last years of his life, as can be seen from its expressive and galant style. Durante’s most well-known work for keyboard is his collection of 6 Sonate per cembalo, where each sonata combines and contrasts an extended fugal “studio” with a short, non-fugal “divertimento”. His Sonata per Cembalo “Le quattro stagioni dell’anno” consists of four movements, each inspired by one season of the year, and constitute one of the rare examples of descriptive music on keyboard instruments.
Program notes:
Gaetano Greco (Napoli, ca. 1657 – Napoli, 1728) was one of the most influential musicians and teachers of his generation. He was trained at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo, where he studied with Giovanni Salvatore, Gennaro Ursino and possibly Francesco Provenzale, and in 1696 he became “Maestro di canto, suono di tasti, composizione e contrappunto” (teacher of singing, keyboards, composition and counterpoint) and Maestro di Cappella at the same institution. Francesco Durante, Leonardo Vinci, Nicola Porpora and Domenico Scarlatti were among his pupils (perhaps also Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, who was a pupil at the conservatory from 1726). Greco’s keyboard works are collected in several manuscripts entitled Intavolature per cembalo. Many of these pieces were intended to be used as teaching material and were written to develop the improvisation skills and the taste of young composition students. His Ballo di Mantua and his Toccata XII are definitely amongst his best and more well-known pieces. Francesco Nicola Fago (Taranto, 1677 – Napoli, 1745) was one of the most famous Neapolitan composers from the beginning of the XVIII century. His fame was mainly due to his sacred works and his qualities as a teacher. His Toccata per cembalo is the only one of his keyboard works that has survived, it was probably written in the last years of his life, as can be seen from its expressive and galant style. Francesco Durante (Frattamaggiore, 1684 – Napoli, 1755) was considered, even more than Fago, one of the best teachers and church composers of his period, J.J. Rousseau exuberantly extolled him as “the greatest master of harmony of Italy, that is to say, of the whole world”. In 1728 he was appointed Primo Maestro at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo, replacing his elderly teacher Gaetano Greco. Alongside his sacred works, even the instrumental ones have exerted a great influence on his contemporaries. His 6 Sonate per cembalo, published in Naples in 1747, explore formal as well as technical aspects of keyboard music and are his most known works for keyboard. Each sonata combines and contrasts an extended fugal “studio” with a short, non-fugal “divertimento”. His Sonata per Cembalo “Le quattro stagioni dell’anno” consists of four movements, each inspired by one season of the year, and constitute one of the rare examples of descriptive music on keyboard instruments.

Andrea Buccarella
Harpsichordist, organist & conductor
Andrea Buccarella was born in Rome in 1987 and undertakes his first musical studies as Puer Cantor in the prestigious choir of the Sistine Chapel (1997 – 2000). After obtaining the diploma in organ and organ composition at the Conservatorio di Santa Cecilia in Rome (2008), he graduates cum laude in harpsichord and historical keyboards under Enrico Baiano (2016). In June 2018 he obtained, with full marks, his master’s degree in harpsichord at the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis under the guidance of Andrea Marcon.
In August 2018 he was awarded the First Prize at the International Competition Musica Antiqua 2018, where he also won the Outhere Prize, first Italian to have achieved these prizes in the history of the Bruges competition.
An intense concert activity, both as soloist and as member of orchestras and chamber ensembles, brought him to perform in important festivals in Europe, the USA, Korea and Japan. He took part in several recordings with Concerto Romano, Abchordis Ensemble, La Cetra, Il Pomo d’Oro, Musica Antique Latina and Ensemble Mare Nostrum. In 2012 he became the artistic director and conductor of Abchordis Ensemble. Since then, Andrea dedicated himself to a conscientious activity of research, aiming for the discovery of musical masterpieces of the past which are not performed in modern times, with special focus on the sacred repertoire of 18th-century Italy. He has conducted the Abchordis Ensemble in many important festivals, among others Festival d’Ambronay (France), Internationale Händel-Festspiele (Göttingen, Germany), Festival classique des Haudères (Switzerland), Mars en Baroque (Marseille, France), Les Riches Heures de Valère (Sion, Switzerland), Valletta International Baroque Festival (Malta), Purtimiro Festival, Pavia Barocca, Urbino Musica Antica, Festival Anima Mea and Festival Alessandro Stradella (Italy). Under his guidance the Abchordis Ensemble won the Public Prize at the showcase organized in 2013 by the REMA (Réséau Européen de la Musique Ancienne), and the first prize at the International Händel Competition 2015 in Göttingen (Germany). As harpsichordist and conductor of Abchordis Ensemble, he released two recordings entirely dedicated to the sacred music of Neapolitan Baroque, for the label SONY Deutsche Harmonia Mundi: Stabat Mater (January 2016) and Dies Irae (May 2018). These include unpublished works by Gennaro Manna, Aniello Santangelo and Giacomo Sellitto in their world’s first recording.

Venue Details

Palazzo Annibaldeschi Via Annibaldeschi, 2
Monte Compatri (RM), 00077
Italia